Ditch the Tetrapak Soup & DIY!

Part of the journey towards a more waste-conscious lifestyle is learning how to DIY. Why? It’s the easiest way to take control of your waste, learn a new skill, and know for absolute certain that the ingredients you’re using are beneficial for you and the planet. We call that a triple win! Today we’ll be exploring how to make a pot of vegetable stock using your own veggie scraps!
 
Before we dive in, we should talk about conventional soup stock, to give you an idea of why we even bother. The next time you venture down the aisles of your local supermarket, check out the stock options (no, we’re not talking about finances!). What you’ll find might be a bit disheartening: almost all stock comes packaged in Tetrapak containers. These containers greatly extend the shelf-life of certain products (nut milks, soups, etc) but at the cost of our planet, as they are not easily recyclable. Composed of layers of paper, plastic, and aluminum, they are a nightmare for recycling facilities…for us, it is less of a headache to make our own nut milks, soups, and stocks than deal with the logistics of properly disposing such a complicated piece of packaging!
 
But we understand the convenience factor offered in a box of pre-made stock…so let us try to sway you towards the DIY side! We promise, it’s also convenient and dare we say…infinitely more fun??
 
  1. Find a freezer-safe container and each time you prep veggies for eating, keep the ends, peels, and withered bits and put them in your container.  We often use an upcycled coconut oil jar! Pop the whole thing in the freezer and keep adding to it until it’s fill.
  2. Once the jar is full, drop the vegetable scraps into a crock-pot, insta-pot, or large stock pot, cover with water and let the whole shebang simmer until it reaches the flavour you’re after! We usually let it go in the crockpot for about a day. Sometimes we toss in fresh herbs if we’re concerned they’ll go off before we can finish them.
  3. When it’s finished cooking, strain the stock, add salt to taste, and let cool. We recommend composting the vegetable scraps if that is available to you.
  4. Transfer the stock into ice cube trays and pop in the freezer. Any extra liquid put in a resealable jar and store in the fridge. Use the fresh stuff within a week or so! 
  5. Once the stock is frozen pop the cubes out and put them in a resealable container and store in the freezer until you need them. Congratulations, you’ve officially bested the Tetrapak beast!
We love that each batch of stock comes out a little different every time, with rich, complex flavour, and of course that it’s turning what would otherwise be waste into a delicious useful product! Can a store-bought box of liquid ever hold a candle to homemade? We think not… 🙂
 
Hope this has inspired you to get creative in the kitchen! Any questions, or tips to share please leave us a comment! 
 
 

This waste conscious living tip is just so simple, anyone can do it, make your our stock out of vegetable scraps! 🍆🥦🍠🥕🌽🌶 1. When cooking keep the ends, skins, and withered bits from veggies and herbs, place them in a freezer safe container, we use an upcycled coconut oil jar, and pop them in the freezer. 2. When the jar is full, drop the vegetable scraps into a crock-pot, insta-pot, or large stovetop pot, cover with water and let simmer until reaching your desired flavour, we usually let it go in the crockpot for about a day. Sometimes we toss in fresh herbs if we’re concerned they’ll go off before we can finish them. 3. When it’s finished cooking add a generous amount of salt to taste, strain the stock, and let cool. We recommend composting the vegetable scraps if that is available to you. 4. Transfer into ice cube trays and pop in the freezer. Any extra put in a resealable jar and store in the fridge use within about a week or 2. 5. Once the stock is frozen pop the cubes out and put them in a resealable container and store the container in the freezer until you need them, they can last a very long time in the freezer. We love that each batch is a little different with rich complex flavour, and of course that it’s turning what would otherwise be waste into a delicious useful product! Thanks for reading 🙏, hope this has inspired you to incorporate waste consciousness in your kitchen! Any questions, or tips to share please comment below 🤗

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